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Resetting our government/political system back to a more representative government?

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zxq9
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 zxq9
(@zxq9)
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I posted this on Minds a week ago. https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/1193929518324776960

Brainstorming:

Imagine if you could peel back the curtain on two alternatives of the future...

Option 1: Crackdown

In one the government uses the so-called "storming" of the Capitol Building as a pretense to enact endless "emergency powers" of the form we see in authoritarian states, tries to crack down on the enormous number of patriotic veterans and other gun owners supposedly to "calm the nation, solve the COVID crisis, end global warming, fix systemic racism, eradicate toxic masculinity, [more SJW bullshit here]..." The result is, of course, organized political violence the citizens would see as justified and essentially defensive.

Option 2: Strict Constitutionalism

In the other you simply abolish every single policy, activity and agency of the federal government that is not explicitly authorized by the Constitution with the recommendation that states can form their own interstate associations and agencies at will.

Question

Which would be called "too radical" by the MSM: Shooting or freeing Americans?

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ryanwold
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(@ryanwold)
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TLDR: Like SportsCenter™️, for Government.  Comprehensive stats on every player in the league.

One of the first steps is to understand who and what that representative government consists of. And it depends..

Depending on where a person lives (and I'll assume, the US), several layers of governance applies. (city, county, state, federal, and special districts). There are more than 90,000 jurisdictions in the US. More than 500,000 elected officials.
 
And, each person/citizen brings their own particular perspectives and interests - for example: local school boards or dog parks vs county unincorporated land issues vs state transportation vs. federal tax legislation.

Lots of public information exists. In different places. This is good.
But it is typically not readily usable nor enjoyable.

So, regarding how to support a more representative government, I'm working toward unifying the interface to government. I think this will help improve how public services are discovered, delivered, and assessed. The right data and tools can increase the resolution and fidelity at which our individual and collective voices are promised representation and how we can account for it.

 

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308code
Posts: 21
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(@308code)
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Another potential help would be single page (defined type-set) bills only.

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Mutchler
(@mutchler)
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Posts: 34

@308code you know, that could happen!  Imagine that every politician had to keep all their promises.  They would no longer come up with those omnibus bills.  Since there are some things they agree with (at least they said they did) and disagree, they (I mean all of them) wouldn’t want those types of bills to vote for.  So single issue bills is something they would have to come up with if they want to keep close to a 100% honesty rating, so they can get re-elected!

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LaRo
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 LaRo
(@laro)
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To revert the results of the "long march through the institutions" it takes an equally long march back, or, instantaneously cripple the power of these institutions.

If you think it's a strategy to (only) remove the leaders of the institutions, then you have to come up with a strategy by which you find new sound minded and skilled individuals by which to replace them (but again, how do you grow them, and where?). New generations are already brainwashed since the fortresses on the front lines of the culture war, the universities, has already fallen in the hands of the enemies of society.

For this reason I found Larry Sanger's idea about independent examination being an interesting thought, as described in this post:

https://larrysanger.org/2020/12/an-idea-for-theological-self-education/

Traditional employers might respect the official degree, but what if I don’t care about traditional employers?

Why not simply do the study for a particular degree in this way: you develop a portfolio (of some sort) with occasional help from experts, and then sit for a written and oral exam, and portfolio and thesis evaluation, by a panel of three more experts? Then when you say, “Oh, sure, I have an M.Div. But it is an Independent M.Div., or I.M.Div., granted by Jones, Smith, and Brown.” Assuming those three are well-known, then why shouldn’t this be respected as the equivalent of a traditional M.Div. that a thesis committee with those three on it would approve?  [...]  This might be revolutionary; but at this point, it is a revolution that I think needs to happen. We need to make the degree-granting process independent of giant, expensive, and increasingly totalitarian universities.

With this background it's not difficult to understand why a certain new administration wants to reduce or even drop student loans. Ideally, brainwashing to be made free or charge.

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308code
(@308code)
Joined: 2 months ago

Eminent Member
Posts: 21

@laro  This would take awhile and would require adaptation, or better yet exclusion, from many organizations that have a vested interest in not allowing it to happen.  I don't think this is the quickest way to institute change.  I agree education is a real problem, it's a bit of a chicken and egg thing with me.  Is education lost because the press is lost or is the press lost because education has been corrupted and is now lost.  This would be a good topic thread in and of itself.  In short, I agree it's worthy of thought, just not a very quick solution and I worry about how much time we have left as a UNITED States.

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